Monthly Archives: August 2019

Design Plan to keep Saltfleet Conservation Area moving toward large-scale wetland vision

A relatively nondescript patch of former agricultural land, prone to regular flooding events from Battlefield Creek, is set to be home to part of a manmade wetland complex.

With a generous grant of $100,000 from the RBC Foundation, previously announced in our electronic newsletter, Hamilton Conservation Authority has hired a consultant to design what is expected to be the region’s largest manmade wetland.

The wetland is planned for a property along Battlefield Creek near First Road in Stoney Creek acquired by the Hamilton Conservation Authority with a $2 million land acquisition grant from the Heritage Green Community Trust. The wetland is expected to be formed by a raised berm along First Road. The berm will hold back hold back water while a variety of natural features will be installed to slow the pace and cool the temperature of Battlefield Creek allowing it to assume its original, meandering shape and spill over into a variety of pools. This approach is expected to provide vital flood prevention downstream and add a massive boost to local biodiversity.

The long-term vision for the Conservation Area is expected to also include a connection to the nearby Devil’s Punchbowl along the Dofasco 2000 Trail.

With this donation, the RBC Foundation has reached a milestone in their support for the Hamilton Conservation Foundation. The donation saw the RBC Foundation recognized at the $250,000-499,999 – Benefactor of Conservation level on the Foundation’s donor wall and at our recent Appreciation Day at the Dundas Valley Golf & Curling Club.

Dofasco 2000 Trail boardwalk gets complete overhaul

A section of the Dofasco 2000 Trail Boardwalk shown after a complete rebuild.

With a donation of $200,000 over two years from ArcelorMittal Dofasco GP, the Upper Stoney Creek trail linking the Devil’s Punchbowl and Vinemount Swamp will be rebuilt and prepared for linkages to the new Saltfleet Conservation Area.

The trail has seen a number of closures in recent years as the Emerald Ash Borer dramatically altered the tree canopy and the boardwalks aging footings began to deteriorate.

With ArcelorMittal Dofasco GP’s gift, the Conservation Authority was able to begin work on a complete rebuild of the boardwalk this past winter. The work is now half complete and is expected re-start this coming winter.

The trail investment is especially timely as it runs alongside part of the Saltfleet Conservation Area and has the potential to connect visitors to the property once the area’s long-term wetland project is complete.

Design Plan to keep Saltfleet Conservation Area moving toward large-scale wetland vision

A relatively nondescript patch of former agricultural land, prone to regular flooding events from Battlefield Creek, is set to be home to part of a manmade wetland complex.

With a generous grant of $100,000 from the RBC Foundation, previously announced in our electronic newsletter, Hamilton Conservation Authority has hired a consultant to design what is expected to be the region’s largest manmade wetland.

The wetland is planned for a property along Battlefield Creek near First Road in Stoney Creek acquired by the Hamilton Conservation Authority with a $2 million land acquisition grant from the Heritage Green Community Trust. The wetland is expected to be formed by a raised berm along First Road. The berm will hold back hold back water while a variety of natural features will be installed to slow the pace and cool the temperature of Battlefield Creek allowing it to assume its original, meandering shape and spill over into a variety of pools. This approach is expected to provide vital flood prevention downstream and add a massive boost to local biodiversity.

The long-term vision for the Conservation Area is expected to also include a connection to the nearby Devil’s Punchbowl along the Dofasco 2000 Trail.

With this donation, the RBC Foundation has reached a milestone in their support for the Hamilton Conservation Foundation. The donation saw the RBC Foundation recognized at the $250,000-499,999 – Benefactor of Conservation level on the Foundation’s donor wall and at our recent Appreciation Day at the Dundas Valley Golf & Curling Club.

Friends of the Eramosa Karst build on years of tireless advocacy with fundraising and volunteer plantings

(l to r) Fred Fuchs, Nicole Bedell, Margaret Reid and Jennifer Stebbing celebrate FOTEK’s achievement

The Foundation was thrilled to recognize the Friends of the Eramosa Karst (FOTEK) this Spring at our 2019 Appreciation Event as they reached the Pioneer of Conservation ($50,000- 99,999) level on our Donor Wall.

Founded in October 2007, the group of volunteers sought to protect the Eramosa Karst Area of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI) from a proposed housing development. They successfully launched a public relations and fundraising campaign aimed at lobbying the provincial government. Ultimately they were successful in getting the Province to donate the Eramosa Karst Conservation Area to the Hamilton Conservation Authority.

Following that success, the volunteers helped to protect the “Feeder Lands” surrounding the Conservation Area, having them turned over to HCA for a long-term lease for a nominal fee. Despite two extraordinary successes, FOTEK’s volunteers have not quit. They continue to fundraise, lead guided hikes through the area and attract dozens of volunteers for annual native species plantings.

We at the Hamilton Conservation Foundation were extraordinarily proud to recognize FOTEK on May 13 at our Appreciation Evening as they reached the Pioneer of Conservation ($50,000-99,999) level on our Donor Wall.